What is My GPS Telling Me About Coronavirus Now

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CNN reported on Easter Sunday, the disease is killing New Yorkers disproportionately. Of the 20,389 deaths in the United States, 8,627, or 42%, have occurred in New York. Its mortality rate is 4.7%, compared with 3.4% in the rest of the country, according to CNN’s figures based on data from the Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering.

A study just came out from France two days ago.  Professor Didier Raoult released the results of a new Hydroxychloroquine treatment study on 1061 patients.  President Macron had visited the professor’s center a day or two earlier to give him greater notoriety.

The study is not the best according to the standards of allopathic research design.  Additionally, some details are missing in the reported information.  Nevertheless, the professor is claiming a mortality of only 0.5% in the group of patients that he gave Hydroxychlorquine to.  Assuming that he did not give it to people with merely a runny nose or a sore throat and gave it to those with chest symptoms and fever, I have a very simple and no-brainer proposition to make.  His 0.5% is an amazing deal compared to 4.7% mortality in New York city.  It is nine time less.  I should take this deal any day of the week.  Whether Hydroxycholorquine will show overwhelming promise in the best studies or not should not be the obsessive focus what we need to think is that Professor Didier Raoult‘s protocol is a deal too good to refuse until we have something convincingly better.

Let me put some icing on the cake now.

From other studies we know that approximately 15% of the patients get serious or significant symptoms.  Putting this into the equation the overall mortality of Covid 19 positive, if all comers are included would be only 0.075%.  So, in the best case scenario if we offer Hydroxychloroquine to those with some chest symptoms and fever only, we have a good deal on the table from the GPS of Professor Didier Raoult.

The Statue of Liberty was a joint effort between France and the United States, intended to commemorate the lasting friendship between the peoples of the two nations. The French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi created the statue itself out of sheets of hammered copper, while Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel, the man behind the famed Eiffel Tower, designed the statue’s steel framework. The Statue of Liberty was then given to the United States and erected atop an American-designed pedestal on a small island in Upper New York Bay, now known as Liberty Island, and dedicated by President Grover Cleveland in 1886.

Is France now offering a reasonable medical strategy and badly needed freedom and liberty to the US economy? Till date more than 16 million have filed for unemployment in the country in the last couple of weeks.

It has been stated: Coronavirus will bankrupt more people than it kills — and that’s the real global emergency.

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What are the possible endgames to overcome Covid 19? In an article in the Atlantic, How the Pandemic Will End, Ed Yong has examined different scenarios.

The best option seems to be a vaccine.  The first steps have been impressively quick. In the end of March, a possible vaccine created by Moderna and the National Institutes of Health went into early clinical testing. That marks a 63-day gap between scientists sequencing the virus’s genes for the first time and doctors injecting a vaccine candidate into a person’s arm. “It’s overwhelmingly the world record,” Fauci said.  But, the experts are still suggesting 18 months to the finish line.  If we can achieve this in a matter of a few months then this would be the finest endgames and we may not need to resort to other interim strategies.

The most viable and plausible endgame, however, seems to be that the virus does what past flu pandemics have done: It burns through the world and leaves behind enough immune survivors that it eventually struggles to find viable hosts. This “herd immunity” scenario would be quick, and thus tempting. But it would also come at a terrible cost: SARS-CoV-2 is more transmissible and fatal than the flu, and it would likely leave behind many more corpses, unfortunately. The United Kingdom initially seemed to consider this herd-immunity strategy, before backtracking when models revealed the dire consequences. The U.S. now seems to be considering it too.

It has been said that 50-75% of the population has to catch the virus to get the herd immunity.

It is not very palatable but it may be the only real option.

What I am suggesting is that if knowingly or unknowingly we are charting on this course then let us state that and in that case what the French professor is offering with 0.5% mortality in cases with significant illness is not a bad proposition.

As we follow Hydroxycholorquine protocol in those with significant symptoms and continue to do better and more precise research we will come up with better strategies to drive down the mortality further and save even more lives.

I am all for more pure research but let not perfect or ideal be the enemy of good.

I am not a fan of Trump but on the issues mentioned above I may find myself in his camp or on a more narcissistic note, for the first time ever, he may find himself in my camp. Just kidding!

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