What is Eid al-Adha? |

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Islam has two main holidays, the first is called Eid al-Fitr (Holiday feast). This holiday takes place at the end of the month of Ramadan. The second festival is called Eid al-Adha (Feast of the Sacrifice) and is considered the holy of two holidays. Eid al-Adha takes place on the 10th day of the month of Dhul Hijja in the Islamic calendar. Eid al-Adha marks the end of the pilgrimage that takes place in Mecca, known as HajjEvery year, 2-3 million Muslims from all over the world make pilgrimages to Mecca in one week. This holiday is sometimes called the big Eid. The Islamic calendar is lunar, so the Eid date falls on different dates of the Gregorian calendar. This happens about 11 days ago every year. For example, if it falls from August 22 of this year, next year it will most likely fall to around August 11.

The origins of this feast stem from pilgrimage and follow in the footsteps of Abraham. Muslims around the world celebrate by sacrificing animals in recognition of the willingness of the Prophet Abraham to sacrifice his son in accordance with God's command. Instead of allowing Abraham to sacrifice his son, God sent a sheep to be killed. The command to sacrifice his son was one of the greatest challenges that Abraham had ever encountered. Although the Quran does not name this son, Muslims consider him to be Ishmael. Muslims remember Abraham’s submission to God and prefer the commandments of God over his own love and desire. Of course, Abraham was an example, obedient to Allah, by nature, and he was not a polytheist. He was grateful for our generosity. We chose him and sent him on the right path. We gave him good in this world, and in the next he will undoubtedly be among the righteous (Quran 16: 120-21).

The meat of animals sacrificing Muslims is divided into three parts: one third is provided to the poor and needy, another third is provided to friends, relatives and neighbors, the last third is kept for personal consumption. It is assumed that the animal will be killed in accordance with Islamic law, which insists that this should be done as humanely as possible. This includes laws such as feeding water and eating animals, knife sharpening and not allowing an animal to see it, and not slaughtering an animal in front of other animals. The act of donating to animals is often misunderstood by those who are not Muslim. God allowed us to eat meat, but only if his name is mentioned when cleaning the animal. This should remind us that, although it is a necessary part of survival, life is sacred. This meat is a blessing from God and is shared with those who are less fortunate. For more on animal rights in Islam, see Here is,

Eid Prayer

Muslims begin their holidays by going to the mosque and offering the Eid prayer. Prayer is offered any time after sunrise, but before lunch. This is a prayer in the community and usually attracts very large crowds of fans, because even Muslims who do not consider themselves to be observers or practitioners still attend the Eid prayers. Because of the large crowd, this prayer is sometimes offered in a larger room or in public places, such as a stadium or park. In addition, prayers are sometimes performed several times throughout the morning to accommodate large crowds. A prayer consists of two cycles of ritual prayer, which usually lasts about five minutes. This is followed by a sermon, which usually does not last long. Before the prayer of Id, parishioners praise and praise God. This is usually done collectively and very rhythmically and melodiously. This singing is that God is great, there is no God but Allah, and all praise belongs to Allah.

Traditions

When the prayer is over, fans congratulate each other, exchange greetings, and then hold their own community celebrations or family gatherings. Muslims often greet each other by saying “Eid Mubarak” or “Blessed Id”. People usually wear their best clothes and exchange gifts. In addition, people often visit family and friends during the day and share food and eat special sweets, which are usually reserved for holidays. Different cultures throughout the Muslim world have different traditions. Muslims in the West tend to adopt some Western customs in celebrating holidays. When a holiday falls on a weekday, Muslims sometimes ask for a day off from work or school. However, some Muslims may attend Aide’s early prayer, and then rush to work during the day.

Conclusion

Eid al-Adha symbolizes the sacrifice that Abraham wanted to make by sacrificing his son. Despite his great love for his son, Abraham chose God over everything else. The command to kill your child was limited to Abraham, but the lessons learned from him remained valid for others. In our life we ​​will face a choice, and we must be ready to sacrifice God and the truth. We must sometimes give up what we love, something funny, or something that we find useful for us, and choose something better for the pleasure of God. The word Islam means submission, and a true Muslim is one who obeys God and puts God before his or her desires and desires. It is this power, purity of heart and sacrifice that God wants from us. People will always be wrong, but if God sees the effort on our party, He will forgive these mistakes and deprive us of His love and compassion. Do you have more questions? Call 877-WhyIslam.

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