Second Pillar Of Islam "Prayer (Solat)"

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Explanation of the second pillar of Islam: prayer and its spiritual aspects. Azan (call to prayer). Friday prayer (Jumuat)

Al-Solat - daily ritual prayer - is one of the five pillars of Islam. Every Muslim prays, or rather says, worships five times a day:

Before sunrise.

After the sun passes the zenith.

Afternoon before sunset.

After sunset.

 ♣ After full darkness until midnight.

Each prayer takes at least five minutes, but it can be extended at will. Alone or with other

Second Pillar Of Islam "Prayer (Solat)"

believers, a Muslim can pray in any clean place: in a mosque or at home, at work or on the road, indoors or on the street. In some cases, such as, for example: illness, travel, war - prayer can be facilitated.

The daily fivefold prayer reminds a Muslim of the importance of faith in all spheres of his life. Every morning a Muslim, purified, appears before the Lord. Muslim prayer is a combination of reading the Quran in Arabic and a number of movements: standing, bowing, prostration and sitting. All ritual prayer expresses humility, humility and complete submission to the Almighty Allah. Also, prayer serves as a reminder of the Day of Judgment, when we all have to report to the Creator for the life we ​​have lived. When the morning begins this way, the Muslim remembers about God and the meaning of life throughout the next day, and, when the time of prayer comes, breaks away from any deeds and worries to worship the Lord.

Prayer strengthens faith, makes a strong connection between man and God, teaches us to perceive worldly life as preparation for eternity. Prepared for prayer, the Muslim turns his face to Mecca "Kahaba or Qibla", the sacred city where the Kaaba is located (a temple built by the prophet Ibrahim (Abraham) and his son Ismail). Prayer is completed by the words of shahada (testimony of faith) and greetings: "Peace be upon you and the mercy of Allah."

A Muslim is allowed to pray alone, however, collective prayer is of special importance, therefore it is much preferable to gather for worship in mosques. Turning to the side of the Kaaba, the believers line up in parallel rows behind the Imam, who leads them in prayer. In many Islamic countries, a call to prayer or "azan" is distributed throughout the city. With the help of a microphone, the muezzin proclaims:

Allahu Akbar (Allahu the Great),

Allahu Akbar (Allahu the Great),

Allahu Akbar (Allahu the Great),

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Allahu Akbar (Allahu the Great),

 
Ashkhad ala la ilaha illa Allah (I testify that there is no deity worthy of worship except Allah),

Ashkhad ala la ilaha illa Allah (I testify that there is no deity worthy of worship except Allah),

Ashkhad anna Muhammadan Rasulullah (I testify that Muhammad is the Messenger of Allah),

Ashkhad anna Muhammadan Rasulullah (I testify that Muhammad is the Messenger of Allah),

 
Hayy'aal salaat (Hurry to prayer)

Hayy'aal salaat (Hurry to prayer)

Hayya'alal falah (Hurry to success)

Hayya'alal falah (Hurry to success)

Allahu Akbar (Allahu the Great),

Allahu Akbar (Allahu the Great),

La ilaha illa Allah (Nothing deserves worship except Allah (God)

Jumat Prayer (Friday Prayer)

Muslims pay special attention to Friday prayer. Every week they gather in mosques for joint worship. Friday prayer has the following features:

  • It occurs during the midday prayer and replaces it.
  • Friday prayer always takes place collectively under the leadership of the Imam. It can not be read alone. Muslims try to plan their time in such a way as to be able to attend the Friday prayer.
  • Jumua (Friday) is the day of additional worship. Unlike the Jewish "Shabbat" (Saturday), Muslims are allowed to work on Friday the same way as on any other day of the week, they are only obliged to interrupt for the Friday prayer. The business can be completed at the end of worship.
  • As a rule, Friday prayers are performed in the mosque, but sometimes, due to some circumstances, the mosque is inaccessible. In this situation, believers look for a suitable place: for example, they rent a room.
  • When the time comes for prayer, the adhan sounds, and the imam addresses those present with a hutboy-sermon. This is the main part of the Friday prayer, so believers should not miss it. While the sermon lasts, the Muslims listen attentively to the end. In non-Arab countries, a laptop is pronounced in the language that is most prevalent in the locality.
  • The Imam pronounces two sermons, each of which begins with the words of praising the Almighty and the blessings of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).
  • After completing the sermon, the imam leads the prayer. In a clear voice he reads surat "Fatih" and a few more verses from the Koran, which completes the prayer.

In addition to Friday there are two more festive collective prayers. One of them - on the occasion of the end of fasting in the month of Ramadan, the second - on the Day of Sacrifice.

Individual additional prayers, especially at night, are not mandatory in Islam, but are highly welcomed and are a common practice among devout Muslims. First Pillar of Islam (The Shahada)


 

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